"Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions.

Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts. This may sound outrageous, but think about how you react when precocious children dominate the talk at an adult party. As women begin to make inroads into formerly ‘male’ domains such as business and professional contexts, we should not be surprised to find that their contributions are not always perceived positively or even accurately."

compoundchem:

Honey is a food oddity in that it doesn’t spoil. Here’s the chemistry behind why, as well as an explanation of how bees make honey: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-qn

compoundchem:

Honey is a food oddity in that it doesn’t spoil. Here’s the chemistry behind why, as well as an explanation of how bees make honey: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-qn

(via johnfuckingwatson)

mrsa-tomei:








SO a brother moves away from the northeast and into St Louis, and suddenly he finds he can’t get loukaniko anywhere.  Said brother says, “no problem, I’m handy in the kitchen, I have a meat grinder and sausage stuffer, I’ll make my own.  How hard can it be to find a loukaniko recipe?”

PRETEND THE BROTHER IS YOU

SO

you look up loukaniko recipes online, what you find is a bunch of insane christmas-tasting sausages that have orange peel in them

which is FUCKED UP because you can’t remember EVER having the taste of orange in loukaniko when you were a little lad growing up in New Hampshire

but you make the recipe anyway because you’re like “well, maybe my palate as a kid just wasn’t sharp enough to pick up the orange peel taste, or maybe it like cooks out or gets really subtle or something”

so you make it and it tastes like a DAMN FRUIT BASKET

it’s like chewing on the DOORFRAME of a YANKEE CANDLE COMPANY

it is like the TIN OF DRIED POTPURRI sitting on the tank of a GRANDMOTHER’S TOILET

and you’re like UGH
WHAT
JEEZUM CROW

so you call your mom and she’s like, “oh yeah, I think orange in loukaniko is a southern greek thing, the loukaniko you grew up with was the Macedonian kind with leeks and bahari”

and you realize once again that this is one of those things you always thought was capital-G Greek, but turns out to be a very specific KIND of greek that is localized to basically the greeks you grew up with which all came from like Pentalofos and Siatista and then settled in southern New Hampshire

(which you’ve basically been finding out slowly over the course of your whole life is like it’s own weird little paraculture like it’s the dang Ozarks of Greece or something, like it’s basically Mepos from Perfect Strangers, this bizarre rocky place that pronounces Pappou with a stress on the first alpha which lacks the beautiful Zorba-esque pronunciation of alpha like a little surprised “ah!” and more like the “AAAA” of an EXTREMELY unlucky lamb bleating as it gets carried off by a vulture on the mountainside)

SO 

you decide that what you need to do is

A) recreate the recipe you remember based on your mom’s recipes, your yiayia’s recipes, and the Proustian recollection of the sausages you ate as a child

and

B) after successfully making that recipe, post it on the internet so that in the future, when people look for loukaniko recipes, they might find this one, which doesn’t taste like some weird citrus-loving scurvy-fearer threw a box of Mike And Ikes into a White Castle slider

MACEDONIAN-STYLE LOUKANIKO:


hog casings (if you just want to make sausage patties instead of tube sausage, you won’t need them)
2 lb lean pork
1 lb fatback 
(OR INSTEAD OF THE ABOVE: 3 lbs of pork shoulder with the big thick layer of fat on one side)
1 lb lamb
2 large leeks (white/ light green parts only)
2 T chopped fresh parsley
1 T salt
1 T black pepper
1 T dried red pepper flakes
1 T oregano
1.5 T ground allspice
1.5 T fennel seed
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 cup white wine 
1/2 cup dry milk powder (this is really to absorb moisture while they’re curing; you can leave it out if you’re just making sausage patties)



1. chop the leeks very fine, and steam them ‘til the bits are all translucent
2. grind meat with coarse meat grinder plate 
3. mix meat with all other ingredients
4. grind again with fine meat grinder plate
5. stuff sausages into hog casings (or just form them into patties)
6. If you made tube-style sausages rather than patties, hang sausages in fridge overnight to cure

These freeze well, so if you’re not gonna eat em within a couple days, throw em into the freezer!  And remember that, as always with meat-grinding, it works best when the grinder and the meat have sat in the freezer for at least a half-hour, so the meat stays nice and firm and doesn’t turn to mush.

HAPPY EATING, YOU SWARTHY SAUSAGEMONGER

The only reason I am re-blogging this is because “YOU SWARTHY SAUSAGEMONGER”. 
I want to use it in my everyday vocabulary from now on. 
Hello there, YOU SWARTHY SAUSAGEMONGER, how are you today?

mrsa-tomei:

SO a brother moves away from the northeast and into St Louis, and suddenly he finds he can’t get loukaniko anywhere.  Said brother says, “no problem, I’m handy in the kitchen, I have a meat grinder and sausage stuffer, I’ll make my own.  How hard can it be to find a loukaniko recipe?”
PRETEND THE BROTHER IS YOU
SO
you look up loukaniko recipes online, what you find is a bunch of insane christmas-tasting sausages that have orange peel in them
which is FUCKED UP because you can’t remember EVER having the taste of orange in loukaniko when you were a little lad growing up in New Hampshire
but you make the recipe anyway because you’re like “well, maybe my palate as a kid just wasn’t sharp enough to pick up the orange peel taste, or maybe it like cooks out or gets really subtle or something”
so you make it and it tastes like a DAMN FRUIT BASKET
it’s like chewing on the DOORFRAME of a YANKEE CANDLE COMPANY
it is like the TIN OF DRIED POTPURRI sitting on the tank of a GRANDMOTHER’S TOILET
and you’re like UGH
WHAT
JEEZUM CROW
so you call your mom and she’s like, “oh yeah, I think orange in loukaniko is a southern greek thing, the loukaniko you grew up with was the Macedonian kind with leeks and bahari”
and you realize once again that this is one of those things you always thought was capital-G Greek, but turns out to be a very specific KIND of greek that is localized to basically the greeks you grew up with which all came from like Pentalofos and Siatista and then settled in southern New Hampshire
(which you’ve basically been finding out slowly over the course of your whole life is like it’s own weird little paraculture like it’s the dang Ozarks of Greece or something, like it’s basically Mepos from Perfect Strangers, this bizarre rocky place that pronounces Pappou with a stress on the first alpha which lacks the beautiful Zorba-esque pronunciation of alpha like a little surprised “ah!” and more like the “AAAA” of an EXTREMELY unlucky lamb bleating as it gets carried off by a vulture on the mountainside)
SO 
you decide that what you need to do is
A) recreate the recipe you remember based on your mom’s recipes, your yiayia’s recipes, and the Proustian recollection of the sausages you ate as a child
and
B) after successfully making that recipe, post it on the internet so that in the future, when people look for loukaniko recipes, they might find this one, which doesn’t taste like some weird citrus-loving scurvy-fearer threw a box of Mike And Ikes into a White Castle slider
MACEDONIAN-STYLE LOUKANIKO:
  • hog casings (if you just want to make sausage patties instead of tube sausage, you won’t need them)
  • 2 lb lean pork
  • 1 lb fatback 
  • (OR INSTEAD OF THE ABOVE: 3 lbs of pork shoulder with the big thick layer of fat on one side)
  • 1 lb lamb
  • 2 large leeks (white/ light green parts only)
  • 2 T chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 T salt
  • 1 T black pepper
  • 1 T dried red pepper flakes
  • 1 T oregano
  • 1.5 T ground allspice
  • 1.5 T fennel seed
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup white wine 
  • 1/2 cup dry milk powder (this is really to absorb moisture while they’re curing; you can leave it out if you’re just making sausage patties)
1. chop the leeks very fine, and steam them ‘til the bits are all translucent
2. grind meat with coarse meat grinder plate 
3. mix meat with all other ingredients
4. grind again with fine meat grinder plate
5. stuff sausages into hog casings (or just form them into patties)
6. If you made tube-style sausages rather than patties, hang sausages in fridge overnight to cure
These freeze well, so if you’re not gonna eat em within a couple days, throw em into the freezer!  And remember that, as always with meat-grinding, it works best when the grinder and the meat have sat in the freezer for at least a half-hour, so the meat stays nice and firm and doesn’t turn to mush.
HAPPY EATING, YOU SWARTHY SAUSAGEMONGER

The only reason I am re-blogging this is because “YOU SWARTHY SAUSAGEMONGER”. 

I want to use it in my everyday vocabulary from now on. 

Hello there, YOU SWARTHY SAUSAGEMONGER, how are you today?

(via assassinregrets)

kryptaria:

avengersageofultron:

The other night my six year old sister and I were watching CA:tWS together. We kept having to pause the final fight sequence so that she could clarify what was happening, and that got me thinking: What if I used my editing skills, dumped the entire 30-minute sequence into Premiere, and deconstructed it to what it would have been without the intercuts?

This is what happened - the original format of Steve and Bucky’s fight.

hopefully tumblr/vimeo doesn’t send me to jail for this 

This is so much better than the intercut, interrupted fight scene. Wow!

SO AWESOME

When my friend won’t let me order McDelivery

obnoxiousexpatsinsingapore:

image

Calling dubdew for McDelivery support group 

justsomefuckingguy:

captcreate:

odditymall:

The Leatherdos is a hair clip that doubles as a multi-tool that combines 5 different tools in a tiny hair clip: screw-drivers, a wrench, a trolley coin, a ruler, and a cutting edge.

—->http://odditymall.com/leatherdos-is-a-hair-clip-multi-tool

This some of that James Bond shit.

Swiss Army Hairclip

Key question - can you bring this through customs. 

(via robotsinrelationships)

What makes tattoos permanent? - Claudia Aguirre

 

madlori:

permissiontogoafterhim:

download (672x378, mp4) [x]

omgomgomg.

So this demonstrates that

  • Robert Redford, an actor of 50+ years experience, still fucks up his lines
  • Samuel L. Jackson is either never IN character, or never OUT of character
  • Mackie is the absolute bestest
  • how da fuq do all these guys do all this convincingly surrounded by green screens
spevvy:

I love him. That. That answer right there. Just wow. All my respect.

spevvy:

I love him. That. That answer right there. Just wow. All my respect.

(Source: latenightseth, via swingsetindecember)